List of Programs

The University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD) provides programs to support the full inclusion and self determination of people with developmental disabilities and their families.

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Act Early Wisconsin COVID-19 ACT Early Recovery and Resilience Initiative

ACT Early Wisconsin COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Initiative

The purpose of the Act Early Wisconsin COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Initiative is to identify and respond to current barriers and opportunities related to improving early identification of developmental delay and disability in each of four steps across early childhood systems: developmental and autism monitoring, screening, referral and evaluation, and access to early intervention. Based on findings of a needs assessment conducted in collaboration with key stakeholders from the Act Early State Team, a plan will be developed, implemented, and evaluated to respond to barriers and opportunities. To better support child and family resiliency during COVID-19 response and mitigation efforts, the initiative will also identify existing, relevant tools, materials, and programs to improve resiliency, and implement and evaluate integration of these resources into early childhood programs.

Contact:

Gail Chödrön,
608-890-0145
chodron@wisc.edu

AEIOu Research Project

AEIOu Research Project

The purpose of this project is to collaborate in a national study with the University of Colorado- Boulder to examine the language skills of young children between the ages of 14 and 36 months who are deaf and hard of hearing. The study examines the language strengths and weaknesses of these children as reported on standardized measures (parent report) to identify factors that are predictive of successful language outcomes. Data collection is complete, analyses are in progress.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Partnership Program (PP)

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Partnership Programs (PP)

The AAC-PP is a statewide program designed to expedite clients’ access to evidence-based, high-quality AAC evaluations and treatment by building the capacity of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) across Wisconsin. The AAC-PP offers online learning modules and one-on-one coaching by CASC staff to support SLPs in the AAC assessment and speech generating device (SGD) acquisition process. ECHO- AAC is part of the AAC-PP, as an online community and learning opportunity designed to provide AAC-related content from experts in the field, to create a network of AAC providers to engage in case-based collaborative problem solving, and to support ongoing successful implementation of speech generating devices across settings.

Contact:

Sarah Marshall, MA, CCC-SLP, AAC
608-263-7726
aacpartnershipprogram@waisman.wisc.edu

Autism Care Network

Autism Care Network

The purpose of this project is to design, develop and test refinements to an improvement and research network focused on autism, to use the Autism Care Network to simultaneously improve clinical care, re-design care delivery systems and conduct quality improvement, health services, outcomes and comparative effectiveness research. The over-arching aim of the Network is to improve quality of life and health of children with autism.

Contact:

Emily Schumacher
608-504-4578
ESchumacher@uwhealth.org

Sara Warner
608-265-8965
sbwarner@wisc.edu

Autism Treatment Programs

Autism Treatment Programs (ATP)

The Waisman Center Autism Treatment Programs (ATP), in partnership with UW Health, offer focused behavioral treatment to individuals with autism and their families. Parent Coaching is the key service.  Parents learn and practice strategies to reduce challenging behavior, teach alternatives skills and enhance family relationships.  Individual treatment is offered supplementary to Parent Coaching.  Individual treatment provides additional practice on select skills that are then carried over to family interactions and activities. The treatment approach is founded on the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), and additional evidence-based strategies. Starting Together, for children ages 2-4 years, offers Parent Coaching and individual treatment during every day play activities and daily routines, guided by The Early Start Denver Model (ESDM). In Growing Together (ages 5-26) parents join their child, teen or young adult to work toward goals identified by the parent. Limited individual treatment is provided for practice on select skills.  Teens and young adults (ages 13–26) and their parents participate in group psychoeducation in Transitioning Together. During group participants learn strategies for a successful transition to adult life, while parents meet to network, problem solve, and learn about resources and supports.

Boy Playing with a Ball

Contact:

Molly Murphy
608-890-3622
memurph3@waisman.wisc.edu

Communication Aids and Systems Clinic (CASC)

Communication Aids and Systems Clinic (CASC)

Smiling Young GirlThe Communication Aids and Systems Clinic provides augmentative alternative communication and computer access services. Interdisciplinary services include direct outcome-focused evaluation and intervention, consultation, technical support, student training, and outreach.

Contact:

Jennifer Seale
Office: 608-263-9909
jseale@wisc.edu

Communication Development Program (CDP)

Communication Development Program

The Communication Development Program provides augmentative and alternative communication and computer access services for individuals living in Dane County, Wisconsin. Interdisciplinary services include direct outcome-focused evaluation and intervention, consultation, technical support, student training, and outreach.

Contact:

Abygail MarxBoy Working on Project in Clinic
608-263-0528
abygail.marx@wisc.edu

Community Outreach Wisconsin

The Community Training and Consultation Program provides service to family members, volunteers, direct care providers, special education teachers, transportation providers, para-professional and professional service providers from all settings providing services in Dane County for people with developmental disabilities. Provision of a variety of training, consultation and educational opportunities individual, small group, and larger audiences related to developmental disabilities.

Contact:

Community Training
Michael Truman, Director
(608) 516-8410
mltruman@wisc.edu

Community of Practice on Cultural and Linguistic Competence in Developmental Disabilities

Community of Practice on Cultural and Linguistic Competence in Developmental Disabilities

Ten states will participate in a 5-year Community of Practice. The goal of the CoP is to increase the number, diversity, and capacity of formal and informal leaders to transform their state/territorial developmental disabilities systems by advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence systemically through changes in values, policy, structures, and practices; and responding effectively to the growing cultural and linguistic diversity among people with DD and their families.

Contact:

Leann Smith DaWalt
608-890-1390
lesmith2@wisc.edu

Community Solutions for Health Equity

Community Solutions for Health Equity

Community Solutions for Health Equity is a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) focused on elevating the voices of communities of color and other communities left out of discussions when local health care systems in the United States are creating policy. The national Community Solutions for Health Equity program attempts to address root causes of racism and bias directly by supporting communities to identify a problem that negatively affects the, envision solutions, and partner with health care systems to co-create and implement solutions. This project provides technical assistance and support to a parent-led non-profit community organization, Padres e Hijos en Accion, to lead a community-based effort to make local health care systems more responsive to the needs of Latino families of children with developmental disabilities and other special health care needs in Dane County, through elevating the voices, stories, and priorities of the people who hold the solutions.

Contact:

Gail Chödrön
608-890-0145
chodron@wisc.edu

Community Training, Intervention, and Evaluation Services (TIES)

Community Training, Intervention, and Evaluation Services (TIES)

Matt Ward works at the Madison Public Library The TIES program offers support to children, adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities who reside in Dane County and present challenging behaviors. Family members, guardians, and service agencies often report significant stress in supporting individuals with developmental disabilities who present challenging behaviors and thus may require additional support. The TIES program seeks to enable these individuals to remain in their natural environment, utilizing and teaching non- punitive ways to redirect or modify specific behaviors. The program provides support and consultation in the community based environment where a person’s challenging behavior occurs.

Contact:

Josh Lapin
608-263-5962
lapin@waisman.wisc.edu

Community TIES Psychiatric Clinic

Community TIES Psychiatric Clinic

TIES Clinic provides psychiatric care and consultation to individuals with developmental disabilities who are unable to obtain psychiatric care from other providers due to financial situation, behavioral issues, or medical complexity. Patients seen in the TIES clinic are also supported by the Community TIES Program.

Contact:

Josh Lapin
608-263-5962
lapin@waisman.wisc.edu

Crisis Response Program

Crisis Response Program

Crisis response services for adult Dane County residents with developmental disabilities are designed to prevent or shorten stays in more restrictive settings. Services include crisis coordination with criminal justice and emergency mental health practitioners, additional support in the person’s home or work place through Crisis Outreach staff, and/or a temporary respite stay at Dane County’s Crisis Home (Safe House) for adults with developmental disabilities.

Contact:

Axel Junker
615-265-9428
junker@waisman.wisc.edu

To learn more visit: Crisis Response Program

DD Community Training and Consultation

DD Community Training and Consultation

Provides service to family members, volunteers, direct care providers, special education teachers, transportation providers, para-professional and professional service providers from all settings providing services in Dane County for people with developmental disabilities. Provision of a variety of training, consultation and educational opportunities individual, small group, and larger audiences related to developmental disabilities.

Contact:

Michael Truman
mltruman@wisc.edu

Genetic Systems Integration Hub-Wisconsin

Genetics Systems Integration Hub-Wisconsin

Genetics in Wisconsin LogoThis project provides a central source for the exchange of information and resources related to maternal child health (MCH) genetics services and programs in WI, maintains the Genetics in Wisconsin website, and facilitates the delivery and evaluation of genetics education for healthcare providers in Wisconsin.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Health Transition Wisconsin

Health Transition Wisconsin


The Youth Health Transition Initiative provides Wisconsin’s youth, family members, providers, and other community collaborators with information on the movement from the pediatric world to adult health care. Tools, materials, and resources are available to help teens, families, and health care systems in the health care transition process.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND)

Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND)

Maternal and Child Health Training Program Logo

The WI LEND Program provides inter-professional leadership education in neurodevelopmental disabilities to graduate students and community members, including professionals, family members and individuals with disabilities. Didactic and experiential learning focuses on systems of care, public health and policy, interdisciplinary family-centered practice, research, evaluation and dissemination. The LEND program recruits trainees and provides interdisciplinary leadership training in collaboration with academic programs at UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee, including the CASTLE Project (Clinical Assessment, Screening, Treatment and Leadership in Evidence-based practices for Children with Autism, 2019-2024), the Masters in Genetic Counseling Studies program located at the Waisman Center, and other Maternal and Child Health-funded training programs in Wisconsin and regionally. Faculty and trainees provide outreach education, technical assistance and direct service to improve the health of children with Autism and other Developmental Disabilities.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

LEND Outcomes Study

LEND Outcomes Study

The primary tool currently used to evaluate the impact of LEND training is the National Information and Reporting System (NIRS) Graduate Long-term Trainee Follow-up Survey, hereafter referred to as the NIRS Graduate Survey. The NIRS Graduate Survey has been administered 2, 5, and 10 years after completion of training. A challenge related to documentation of the impact of LEND training using the 14 question NIRS Graduate Survey is a comparison group. For this study, LEND trainees are recruited to participate in the study to complete the NIRS survey annually, and to identify a comparison peer that is receiving similar graduate training, but is not participating in LEND long term training. Long term leadership skills and career attributes are being compared for former trainees and non-trainee cohorts.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Longitudinal Study of Wisconsin Adult Long Term Care

Longitudinal Study of Wisconsin Adult Long Term Care

The purpose of this study is to understand changes over time in services and quality of life for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who receive adult long term care supports in the state of Wisconsin. Family members and individuals with IDD will complete an online survey once a year for five consecutive years during the study.

Contact:

Leann Smith DaWalt
608-890-1390
lesmith2@wisc.edu

Nourishing Special Needs Nutrition Network (WIC)

Nourishing Special Needs Nutrition Network (WIC)

WIC logo

This contract with the state Birth Defects Surveillance Program provides training and technical assistance to WIC nutritionists in the state of Wisconsin, including a monthly series of educational teleconferences, an annual workshop on nutrition topics for children with special needs, and an updated nutrition toolkit available publicly and for all WIC nutritionists in the state.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Research Engagement with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Research Engagement with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

This new grant builds on earlier collaboration with the Special Olympics Health Communities Program that incorporated people with IDD as co-researchers. In this new project, the investigators will create a Toolkit to support the engagement of people with IDD in the development of research.  The Toolkit will be the first of its kind to provide an accessible, structured process to engage people with IDD and related stakeholders as partners in the research enterprise.

Contact:

Karla Ausderau
608-262-0653
kausderau@wisc.edu

The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)

The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)

SEED is a nationwide study of autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. In collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Wisconsin SEED is now evaluating the impact of COVID-19 on families with young children. This new research will help highlight the impact of disruptions in services (including but not limited to intensive behavioral therapies in children with autism) on long-term health outcomes.

Contact:

Maureen Durkin
608-263-7507
mdurkin@wisc.edu

Southern Regional Center Children And Youth With Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN)

 Southern Regional Center Children And Youth With Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN)

CYSHCN LogoThe Southern Regional Center for CYSHCN, funded by the State Maternal Child Health block grant, benefits families with CYSHCN and the providers who support them through providing information, referral and follow up services; promoting a parent-to-parent support network and family leadership development; and increasing local capacity of community-based systems of support.

Contact:

Tim Markle
608-262-8033
markle@waisman.wisc.edu

Project ECHO

Project ECHOProject ECHO ® is a lifelong learning and guided practice model that is designed to create knowledge-sharing networks.  Waisman Center has ECHOs in multiple areas for different target audiences such as AAC users and their families, primary care providers, speech-language pathologists, teachers, occupational therapists, and social workers.

Find if one of our ECHOS is  right for you: https://www.waisman.wisc.edu/echo/.

Waisman Early Childhood Program (WECP)

Waisman Early Childhood Program

Young Boy in ClinicWaisman Early Childhood Program (WECP) is a center based early childhood program that is meeting the needs of a developmentally diverse group of children ages 1 through 6. Approximately two-thirds are developing typically, and one third may have a special education need.

Contact:

Ann Lauritzen
608-262-4718
alauritz@wisc.edu

Waisman/UW Health Specialty Clinics

Waisman/UW Health Specialty Clinics

The clinics provide specialized health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. The clinics include: Autism and DD, Cerebral Palsy, Medical Genetics, Newborn Follow- up, Down syndrome, Neuromotor, Pediatric Brain Care, Biochemical Genetics, and Bone Dysplasia. All clinics offer diagnostic and assessment services, and a few clinics provide ongoing treatment and intervention.

Contact:

Amy Whitehead
608-263-5964
whitehead@waisman.wisc.edu

WIN - Wellness Inclusion Nursing

Wellness Inclusion Nursing (WIN)

Adult PatientWellness Inclusion Nursing is a community based nursing program that is designed to provide assessment, consultation and training to agencies and staff providing care to individuals with developmental disabilities.

Contact:

Sherry Schultz
608-264-2622
sherry.schultz@wisc.edu

Wisconsin Care Integration Initiative

Wisconsin Care Integration Initiative

Young Boy coloringThe Wisconsin Care Integration Initiative (WiCII) project aims to increase family-centered, integrated systems of care for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD), with a focus on medically underserved areas and populations. WiCII is partnering with primary care practices to provide family navigation services to medically underserved families of children with/at risk for ASD/DD; increase provider knowledge and skill related to early identification, referral, and supporting families to access services; and increase access statewide to culturally and linguistically competent educational resources to improve family self-efficacy in navigating systems of care. To build provider capacity for early identification, referrals, and care in local communities, WiCII supports a tele-mentoring approach to provide education and case-consultation to practitioners called ECHO Autism (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes).  Safe While you Wait is supported by WiCII and Magic Pebble, and addresses safety concerns and equisp families with the devices and resources they need to ensure their child’s safety in advance of their Waisman Center clinics evaluation appointment.

Contact:

Gail Chödrön
608-890-0145
chodron@wisc.edu

Wisconsin Living Well

Wisconsin Living Well

The Wisconsin Living Well project is led by the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities (BPDD), will partner with Waisman University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD); Disability Rights Wisconsin, the Protection and Advocacy organization (P&A); WI Division of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS); self-advocacy, family and direct support provider networks; managed care and self-direction agencies and others. Living Well is a 5-year systems change approach composed of two inter-related, evidence-based elements aimed at individuals, families, providers, and communities and delivered as a strategy package: (1) capacity building to increase health/safety and improve quality of life, and (2) a comprehensive monitoring effort. The overall goal is to increase health, safety, independence and well-being of people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) living in the community.

Contact:

Leann Smith DaWalt
608-890-1390
lesmith2@wisc.edu

Wisconsin Partnership Program- COVID-19

Wisconsin Partnership Program- COVID-19

This project aims to elucidate the impact of COVID-19 on the health and wellbeing of people with IDD, evaluate the current systemic and community responses to mitigate those effects, and provide recommendations to guide service delivery for Wisconsin nonprofit community organizations to best meet the needs of individuals with IDD.

Contact:

Karla Ausderau
608-262-0653
kausderau@wisc.edu

Wisconsin Sound Beginnings

Wisconsin Sound Beginnings

Sound Beginnings LogoWisconsin Sound Beginnings is funded by an MCHB grant to the state Department of Health Services to assure that all babies born in Wisconsin receive newborn hearing screening and appropriate follow-up.  Working with the Regional Centers for Children and Youth with Special Needs in Wisconsin, parents of children diagnosed with hearing loss are offered family support and resources to promote access to relevant services.  These efforts are coordinated through a contract with the Waisman Center.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Wisconsin Study to Explore Early Development in Autism (SEED)

Wisconsin Study to Explore Early Development in Autism (SEED)

Girl Playing with Toys with BeadsThis funding will establish a recruitment, data collection and collaborative research site in Wisconsin for a multi-site study of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The overall goals of the SEED are to: characterize phenotypic variability and identify relatively homogenous subgroups of children with ASD; and investigate risk factors for ASD by comparing the early exposures and development of well-characterized ASD cases and controls selected to represent diverse population subgroups.

Contact:

Maureen Durkin
608-263-7507
mdurkin@wisc.edu

Wisconsin Surveillance of Autism and Other DD (WISADDS)

Wisconsin Surveillance of Autism and Other DD

WISADDS LogoThis is a multiple source investigation to determine and monitor the number of eight year-old children in the population with an autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual disability. The Wisconsin study is also investigating cerebral palsy. This is a joint undertaking with CDC and the protocol is being implemented in several other states in the nation.

Contact:

Maureen Durkin
608-263-7507
mdurkin@wisc.edu

Youth Health Transition Initiative for CYSHCN

Youth Health Transition Initiative for CYSHCN

This project funded by the state Title V CYSHCN Program (MCH Block grant to WI ) provides leadership to the CYSHCN network to support youth with special health care needs to transition to adult health care; providing training and technical assistance to community members and service systems , supporting QI grants to health care providers and systems; and linking with the national “Got Transition” initiative through the healthtransitionWI.org website.

Contact:

Anne Bradford Harris
608-263-5796
harris@waisman.wisc.edu

Wisconsin Integrated Transition Implementation

Wisconsin Integrated Transition Implementation

This three-year project funded by the Administration for Community Living will support the Wisconsin Transition Planning Coalition of engaged stakeholders with lived and professional experience to implement successful transitions to community living for Wisconsin youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). The goal of the project is for families and transition-age youth with ID/DD in medically underserved Wisconsin communities to receive relevant information and support for Integrated Transition Planning (ITP) by the time the youth turns eighteen years of age. ITP includes integrating planning for health, employment and post-secondary education transitions.

Contact:

Lynn Hrabik
920- 833-0051
hrabik@wisc.edu

WI Congenital Disorders Program/Newborn Screening Program

WI Congenital Disorders Program/Newborn Screening Program

Infants who test positive for a genetic metabolic condition are seen in the Biochemical Genetics Clinic at the Waisman Center. The majority of these conditions are treated with nutrition and infants receive comprehensive care from a team including the following clinicians: metabolic physicians, nurse practitioners, dietitians, genetic counselors and nurses. The Biochemical Genetics Clinic follows individuals from infancy through adulthood to promote lifelong treatment of metabolic disorders for the best outcome.

Contact:

David Wargowski
(608) 263-8687
wargowski@pediatrics.wisc.edu